JF make 205
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Creation Date: 2002-08-24
Hi there. These two pictures are not from the new Scene 6. You might notice if you're a keen reader of JF, that this is kinda like scene 1, except everything is different. You see, I have this idea that scenes 1-5 are not the final version of JF Comic. They are a rough draft of the JF Comic. Since I'm such a terrible artist, I used the first five scenes to learn the ropes. Now I have criticized myself and created better models so now I can redo the entire thing. If you told a normal comic artist that their work was substandard and that they would have to redo it all, he/she would say, "You are completely insane!" You see, normal comics take many hours. Three to six hours per page is not unusual. For JF, it's similar, but different. I am not a normal comic artist. I am a programmer. Instead of using my immense talent of which I lack, I made programs that do it for me. I made these programs so that I would not have to draw really anything. I do have to do a whole lot of dragging and dropping and a small bit of number-crunching. But really, To produce 5 scenes with 17 pages, I put 200 hours into programming, 100 hours into modelling, 20 hours into skinning, 5 hours into direction, and 50 hours into useless Making of JFs. Doing the numbers, you see that I could have finished all 24 scenes (128 pages) of JF by now if I were to have to spent only 20 hours per week on JF. You see, a lot of the slowness you see is not the hard work that I'm doing everynight, but rather the fact that I'm playing games, learning electromagnetism, and doing other fun things. But that's okay because I am so much more talented in programming than modelling. That's why the models look bad. So after all that time, I have models that look good. Now I have to do everything over. I also have a program that works 100%. Had I done all 24 scenes, it would have been a huge accomplishment, but would achieve nothing since I'd have to do it over again. So now, my 6-month plan is to put 5 hours into programming, 20 hours into modelling, 5 hours into skinning, 20 hours into directing, and 5 hours into Making Of JF rants. That allows a lot of time for studying. It also allows for me to set a goal to produce JF Final Draft scenes 1-15 by March 1st. That is a rapid pace, but I think I can do it if I push myself to do more directing. This Making Of JF page is the first step. For each scene, I have to get all the characters lined up in semi-correct positions. So then I can just drag them around. None of the four characters (Jav, EG1, warehouse, Seattle) will be exactly how they are now in JF. I plan to use the Dojo Ambush model for EG1. I plan to use the Jav 40 model for Javantea. I plan to give some backsides to those Warehouse walls. I plan to use the new Los Angeles terrain model (with dome at night) instead of the Seattle terrain model. Of course, I have a few extra characters, but adding them is just a copy and paste maneuver. So, that is how JF Final Scene 1 will come together. I'm going to work on Scene 6 still because people want to see something new, but I'm going to do Scene 1 simultaneously since the very nature of 3d modelling permits it and encourages it.

I think its a really wonderful system. It isn't down pat, but it will be soon. Also, it depends a lot on the artist. A slacker like me can make stuff look good or bad depending on his/her mood. What I'm trying to say is that if you are interested, e-mail me and we can talk about getting you set up with a BETA version of my software. Then you can be the second low-poly 3d Manga artist.

I played Dark Side of the Moon tonight (the game, not the Pink Floyd album). It's interface is revolutionary. It's 3d, but it's a movie, right? A full 360 view from every five steps and video in between. How? First, it's all pre-rendered 3d. Then they have some type of exporter that exports the entire 3d world into controllable video with those full 360 views. The video aspect is very cool. It allows for drama that is slightly better than Phantasmagoria, one of my favorite old-school games. The story is great. I like the fun atmosphere. Each person has their own vices and you are forced to use them. The creators wanted it to be more realistic than fun though. That was a slightly bad point for me. Like Phantasmagoria, it came on far too many CDs (6 CDs, Phantasmagoria came on 8 CDs). Unlike Phantasmagoria, it forced me to switch about 100 times in a 12 hours that I played it (Phantasmagoria only switched 8 times). The difference is that Phantasmagoria disks were temporally seperated while DSOM disks were spatially seperated. In other words, I had to switch CDs every time I moved from one level to another. I heard that DSOM came out in a DVD version with just 1 DVD instead of many CDs, but DSOM is out of print. Why is it out of print? Because it didn't sell well. Why didn't it sell well if it was the best adventure game in 1995? Because of it's spatial disk seperation. Even though it was the best withstanding, people chose games that were easier on the annoying factor (I believe that Sanatarium came out at the same time and did much better). So sadly, SouthPeak Interactive is no longer making Video Reality games (they made two: Temujin and DSOM). However... I think that the time has come for something as cool as that. Where has the video drama adventure genre gone? Don't tell me people are content with Resident Evil and Tomb Raider, sheesh. With DivX out, people should grab at the chance.
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